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Intellectual Disability

A neurotypical person can function between the three domains of development: conceptional, social and practical. The average score in an IQ test is anywhere between 85-115%. Data to determine the results is collected from the knowledge of maths skills, memory, language and spatial perception. The ability to remember, problem-solve and recognise relationships helps to determine the overall score as well.

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Approximately 75 per cent of people with intellectual disability are only mildly affected, with 25 per cent moderately, severely or profoundly affected.

 

Australian Disability Clearinghouse on Education and Training

Intellectual Disability is the term used to describe impairment in the three main areas of development.

A person who has an intellectual disability can lack the skills necessary to communicate effectively, take care of themselves or may not be as socially aware as others. Development and learning are slower than a typically developed child.

Children and adults diagnosed with an Intellectual Disability may have a hard time acquiring new skills, communicating with others and retaining information. People with an intellectual disability can learn it may just take a little longer than a typically developing person.

Intellectual Disability is a life long disability affecting approximately 1% of the Australian population. Two-thirds (75%) of Intellectual Disability cases identify as mildly-affected, with the remaining one third (25%) classified as moderate, severe or profound. An intellectual disability is more prevalent in males than in females.

What are the Signs of Intellectual Disability?

    • Tell-tale warning signs that your child may have an intellectual disability are many and may not all present. For example, children with an intellectual disability may:
    • be a delay in learning to sit, rolling over, crawling, or learning to walk;
    • delayed speech, or have a speech impairment,
    • find it hard to remember things,
    • can not comprehend how to pay for things,
    • has difficulty understanding social rules,
    • has problems seeing the consequences of their actions,
    • has issues solving problems, 
    • has trouble thinking logically.

Usually, a child is not diagnosed with an Intellectual Disability until they have reached the age of 4-6. Before this, they may be diagnosed with Global Development Delay (GDD). Diagnosis is based on two things by psychiatrists: the first is the ability to learn, think for themselves, problem-solve and use abstract thinking (which measures Intellectual functioning or our IQ). The second part of the diagnosis determines our adaptive behaviour which involves everyday living skills such as getting dressed, being able to communicate effectively, the ability to feed ourselves and social skills at home, in the work environment or the playground and classroom.

People who have an Intellectual disability may experience:

      • difficulty understanding new information
      • may struggle with communication and social skills
      • have a slow cognitive processing time
      • find difficulty in processing sequential information
      • may not grasp comprehending abstract concepts.

Recommended Supports:

      • Skills Teaching through behaviour therapy or occupational therapy
      • Speech Pathology
      • Specialised and tailored teaching strategies
      • Psychologist

 

ID
Intellectual Disability

Approximately 75 per cent of people with intellectual disability are only mildly affected, with 25 per cent moderately, severely or profoundly affected.

 

Australian Disability Clearinghouse on Education and Training

A neurotypical person can function between the three domains of development: conceptional, social and practical. The average score in an IQ test is anywhere between 85-115%. Data to determine the results is collected from the knowledge of maths skills, memory, language and spatial perception. The ability to remember, problem-solve and recognise relationships helps to determine the overall score as well.

Intellectual Disability is the term used to describe impairment in the three main areas of development.

A person who has an intellectual disability can lack the skills necessary to communicate effectively, take care of themselves or may not be as socially aware as others. Development and learning are slower than a typically developed child.

Children and adults diagnosed with an Intellectual Disability may have a hard time acquiring new skills, communicating with others and retaining information. People with an intellectual disability can learn it may just take a little longer than a typically developing person.

Intellectual Disability is a life long disability affecting approximately 1% of the Australian population. Two-thirds (75%) of Intellectual Disability cases identify as mildly-affected, with the remaining one third (25%) classified as moderate, severe or profound. An intellectual disability is more prevalent in males than in females.

What are the Signs of Intellectual Disability?

    • Tell-tale warning signs that your child may have an intellectual disability are many and may not all present. For example, children with an intellectual disability may:
    • be a delay in learning to sit, rolling over, crawling, or learning to walk;
    • delayed speech, or have a speech impairment,
    • find it hard to remember things,
    • can not comprehend how to pay for things,
    • has difficulty understanding social rules,
    • has problems seeing the consequences of their actions,
    • has issues solving problems, 
    • has trouble thinking logically.

Usually, a child is not diagnosed with an Intellectual Disability until they have reached the age of 4-6. Before this, they may be diagnosed with Global Development Delay (GDD). Diagnosis is based on two things by psychiatrists: the first is the ability to learn, think for themselves, problem-solve and use abstract thinking (which measures Intellectual functioning or our IQ). The second part of the diagnosis determines our adaptive behaviour which involves everyday living skills such as getting dressed, being able to communicate effectively, the ability to feed ourselves and social skills at home, in the work environment or the playground and classroom.

People who have an Intellectual disability may experience:

      • difficulty understanding new information
      • may struggle with communication and social skills
      • have a slow cognitive processing time
      • find difficulty in processing sequential information
      • may not grasp comprehending abstract concepts.

Recommended Supports:

      • Skills Teaching through behaviour therapy or occupational therapy
      • Speech Pathology
      • Specialised and tailored teaching strategies
      • Psychologist
mother-feeding-disabiled-child

Up to 3% of children before the age of 5 are affected by intellectual development delays or global developmental delays. If you suspect a child or loved one has or may have a delay in development, please ask your GP for advice. Red flags to look for do not necessarily mean Intellectual Disability or Global Development Delay however, they are there for a reason. These warnings should be taken seriously.

DO HEED THE WARNINGS SERIOUSLY AND GET YOUR CHILD CHECKED IF YOU SUSPECT DEVELOPMENTAL DELAYS. EARLY INTERVENTION PROGRAMMES FOR YOUR CHILD MEAN A BETTER OUTCOME FOR BUILDING AND DEVELOPING SKILLS LATER IN LIFE.

Over 90% of adults with intellectual disability live independantly or with family members

ACCESS SUPPORTS TO IMPROVE YOUR WELL-BEING